Who considered portraying singer Russ Columbo in a biopic movie? Try George Clooney, Tom Cruise, Perry Como, for starters…

by Beverly Adam (author of Two Lovers: the love story of Carole Lombard and Russ Columbo).51gcwn4yjsl

Who wanted to portray Russ Columbo either in a movie or in a television musical? George Clooney, Tom Cruise, Tony Curtis, Perry Como for starters… Some of Hollywood’s biggest movie stars and singers considered taking on the challenge of portraying the well-liked, handsome singer, violin virtuoso and gifted songwriter, who had been engaged to marry film actress Carole Lombard.

Russ Columbo left a big imprint on Hollywood upon his death in 1934, with his handsome good-looks, velvety smooth baritone voice, and wonderful romantic songs, which he had made famous on stage, radio, and in the movies. Upon his death, Russ Columbo left behind thousands of fans, including some emerging Italian-American and Latin singers/actors who looked at him as a role-model to follow.

In 1945 Paramount Pictures considered casting Andy Rusell as Russ Columbo for a bio-picture about him. Andy Russell was born in Mexico as Andres Rabago. He received his stage name from orchestra leader Gus Arnheim, who had worked with Russ Columbo at the Cocoanut Grove. Arnheim was Andres Rabago’s  legal guardian, as he was underage when he started working in the orchestra. The young Andres Rabago performed as a drummer and solo vocalist. Arnheim suggested Rabago change his name in order to draw a bigger audience and to avoid discrimination as a Latin. Arnheim told him,  “I used to have a singer, a famous singer fella that  took Bing Crosby’s place years ago. His name was Russell Columbo, one of the famous singers of the era. I’m gonna call you Russell–Andy Russell.” (Wikipedia) And so, Rabago’s name was changed to Andy Rusell. He, unfortunately, was not chosen for the star role in the movie.


Andy Russell

Singer Perry Como had met Russ Columbo in Chicago at the Golden Pheasant Club in 1933, while Russ Columbo was performing there promoting songs for the motion pictures he was in. The experience of meeting his idol left a big impression on the young Perry Como and it was well-known that being a first generation Italian-American himself, Como styled himself to be like Columbo.

In 1946 Perry Como’s recording of Prisoner of Love, which Russ Columbo had co-written and made famous, went #1 on the Billboard Charts. Perry Como tried to take on the role of a Columbo in a bio-picture, but it did not come off.


Perry Como


1950’s Heartthrob Johnny Desmond (born: Giovanni Alfredo De Simone),  the singer who had made a “White Suit Coat and a Pink Carnation”  popular, had also recorded one of  Columbo’s biggest hits, “Guilty”, on his record label. Johnny Desmond, it was reported, had planned to make a musical out of The Russ Columbo Story and wanted to perform it on Broadway first, and then turn it into a movie with a Hollywood production company. His plans fell apart when he disputed with NBC who claimed the rights and were planning a TV series based on Russ Columbo’s life. Desmond as late as 1975 still planned to do a musical motion picture about Russ Columbo.  He was interviewed by The Chicago Tribune at the Playboy Club’s living room and told the reporter, “I think the movie is going to be done. I had always planned to play Columbo, but now I think I should play his brother Fury. (He meant Fiore, Russ Columbo’s older brother). I’d like to do the voice over for Columbo (singing).” To my knowledge he never did. He passed away in 1985, not having achieved his goal to portray Russ Columbo’s life.

Don Cornell had a smooth baritone voice like Russ’s and was born into a large Italian-American family in Bronx, NY, as Luigi Valaro. Cornell changed his name during World War II, Americanizing it. He made himself more acceptable to audiences in order not be booed-off the stage due to anti- Mussollini sentiment when they said his name, an event which had previously occurred during one of his performances. He had several billboard hits that went to the top of the charts in the 1950’s  and also was rumored to have been considered for The Russ Columbo Story.


Singer and actor Tony Martin, the husband of famous actress Cyd Cherisse, had his own television show during the 1950’s and a long musical film career to back his ambitions. One of them was to portray Russ Columbo in a biopic movie musical. Martin went so far as to approach one of Russ Columbo’s sisters about the possibility of obtaining the rights to Columbo’s life story, but once again the production of another Russ Columbo Story fell through.


In the 1950’s finding the perfect singer/actor to portray Russ Columbo was a bit like a casting call of 1950’s Italian-American singers Hall of Fame. This included young teen-idol, the dreamboat Alan Dale. He had made a hit of the songs  “Oh, Marie”, “Gentle and Sweet” (#10 Billboard) and “Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White”.  The teen was considered to be extremely talented and went by the moniker Prince of The Baritones. He had his own TV show with Dumont and CBS  P51tnhutpsyl-_sy300_ictures in 1948,  when he was still underage.  Alan Dale recorded the hit song “Heart of My Heart” with fellow Russ Columbo wannabes Don Cornell and Johnny Desmond. The song was on the Billboard Chart at #10 in 1953.  Alan Dale was well qualified to portray Columbo. He too came from an Italian-American family (bn: Alando Sigismondi) and was born in New York. His father had been a theater comedian and Alan Dale started performing onstage when he was nine years old.  It was reported in a couple of sources that in 1955 he was approached by film producers who intended on making a motion picture of Russ Columbo’s life. It seemed like the singer was a “sure in” for the role, but for an unknown reason (most likely the copyrights) the motion picture was never made.

Movie actor Tony Curtis also had set his sights in the 1950’s on making a musical about Russ Columbo  for NBC, which was to be aired for a one hour program on television. The planned production went as far as rehearsals, but for various reasons, including a dispute with Johnny Desmond about the rights,  the show fell apart and was not aired.


Tony Curtis


In the early 1990’s  Tom Cruise and Michelle Pfeiffer are at the top of their movie careers. Michelle Pfeiffer’s ethereal beauty and comedic timing is being compared in the newspaper movie reviews to that of legendary 1930’s comedian Carole Lombard.  Michelle Pfeiffer and Tom Cruise both won Golden Globe Awards for their outstanding performances  as actors in film at the same time. There begins a rumor that they should be paired together as a movie couple up on the screen. Michelle Pfeiffer  as Carole Lombard, and Tom Cruise as her singing love interest Russ Columbo. It would have made a great motion picture, however a biopic does not develop and the idea is dropped.

Golden Globe Awards Pfeiffer Cruise 1990

Michelle Pfeiffer and Tom Cruise



George Clooney, the famously handsome actor/director who owns a villa in Italy, had also considered making a movie about Russ Columbo based on the book Crooner Mystique by Dennis Penna.


Rosemary Clooney and Bing Crosby

George Clooney’s favorite aunt was the well-known singer Rosemary Clooney. She  had once lived in the same house Russ Columbo had rented on Roxbury Drive in Beverly Hills at the time of his death. The house had been built by actor Monte Blue in the 1920’s and had been lived-in by the song composer George Gershwin. Rosemary  Clooney lived there with Jose Ferrer, raising her children and doing radio shows. It was said Bing Crosby came one day there to do a  show with Rosemary. Crosby, wrongly thinking that Russ had died in the house, refused to step a foot into the den. He shouldn’t have worried. Russ Columbo had  been shot and killed by his friend Lansing Brown in Brown’s parents’ home, not there.

Rosemary Clooney’s children, a bit frightened by the idea that someone had died in their house, used to call out as they went downstairs at night. “Hello Russ, we’re coming down!” Sadly in 2005 the house was torn down and George Clooney had by then moved on to other projects. The other house, the Outpost Drive house, which Russ Columbo owned and lived in with his parents, still remains in existence.

The only singer to complete a project  and sing with the title: The Russ Columbo Story, was singer Paul Bruno, who released an album in 1960, where according to Billboard Chart, Bruno “warbled tunes associated with Russ Columbo,” and  the album cover featured several pictures of  Russ Columbo. For more information about Russ Columbo read my free blog:So how famous was Russ Columbo?